1 Shot Wednesday: Hydrangeas

Seville, Italian hydrangeas

Hydrangeas grow all over the world. Except for white ones which have no pigment, hydrangea flower color changes based on the pH in the soil. A pH of 5.5 or lower will sprout blue hydrangeas, a pH of 6.5 or higher will produce pink hydrangeas, and soil in between 5.5 and 6.5 will have purple hydrangeas.

When I was a girl and walked to school, I’d pass by a pretty house whose owner pruned a row of seven bushes into trees. Each tree owned a color. Petals changed from pastel pink to fuschia to violet to lilac. That she or he altered the pH in the soil to produce the different flower colors impressed me. As I walked by, I played a game that I was a butterfly and hopped from cluster to cluster swimming in the colors. Whenever I see hydrangeas, I’m reminded of the game. There are no hydrangeas in my part of Arizona. When I travel and come across them, their absolute beauty takes my breath away, and I feel like swimming.

24 thoughts on “1 Shot Wednesday: Hydrangeas

  1. We have a white climbing hydrangea at the side of the house. It is of the ‘lace’ type, not producing such large round flower heads. You can see it in one of these photos, taken after it had flowered.
    https://beetleypete.com/2018/11/11/our-home-in-beetley/
    Best wishes, Pete. x

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    1. How beautiful! I remember this post and your pictures. You have a lovely home and yard. Thanks for sharing, Pete.

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  2. I love hydrangeas. We had them in different colours in different parts of our garden when I was growing up.

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    1. Aren’t they something else? So unique and gorgeous. Thanks, Abbi.

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  3. I have 2. One is blooming blue while the other pink. I knew about the ph levels, but can’t seem to get them to change when I want to. No one ever accused me of having a green thumb, so I’ll use that as an excuse!!

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    1. Two! How nice. Even in yards the levels change but to manipulate the earth to get them to be different is a gift I don’t possess. I’m right with you–no green thumb.

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    1. They are at once delicate and dazzling. I love that contrast about them.

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  4. Love those flowers. They grow well in the mountains of India but I cant seem to grow them successfully in this sub-tropical climate.

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    1. They do need the cool, wet climate, don’t they? Hard to do that in AZ. Although, by Flagstaff, where it is indeed cool and wet, they grow an hour away from me.

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      1. I was amazed when I made my first trip to Arizona. It was high summer and no air conditioning in the car. LOL. We improvised by getting a bucket of ice each in service stations and breathing through that held up to our noses. So, it was a very pleasant surprise to see Flagstaff on the horizon with its cooler temperature and beautiful greenery.

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        1. You tell a funny story. Ian. You captured the extreme of AZ!

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  5. another one with part of the image out of focus. i like that effect. i also like the 1 because i dont have to choose my favorite. when all 5 are so good, it seems unfair to single out only 1,

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    1. Well, when I do something and take a lot of pictures of the place/event, I feel the need to share many pictures. Ideally, struggling to pick one of out many pictures is a fun kind of torture. When I thought of 1 shot Wed. I was thinking of a conveying a bit of a story. A peek about me. Not necessarily a great photo, but one that has an emotional trigger. I appreciate your comment.

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  6. Your first picture, especially, is really beautiful.

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    1. Thanks, John. The bushes were quite mature. It was a garden courtyard overlooking the water in Seville. They were massive.

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  7. Stunning. Such sharp and vibrant purple. Need to show this to my daughter (she adores purple)

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    1. Cool! I love purple, too. It’s loving two colors at once. Cheating. Thanks for commenting, Keith.

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  8. Beautiful!
    Our tulips are ready to pop. Finally.

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    1. I love tulips. Hyacinths? My favorites are lilacs and irises.

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  9. Very pretty Cindy and a nice story too.

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    1. Thanks, Lloyd. For this series, I’m trying to add why the photo has meaning for me. The emotive touch of a picture.

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  10. Beautiful!! Reminiscing nice childhood memories are always fun!
    We have lilac hydrangeas at home too, but the pigment isn’t as strong as it ought to be!! And when it’s turns a dull pink, it almost looks brownish.
    But the slightly light blueish lilac pigment is beautiful!! Have taken so many pictures of them myself.

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