L13FC: Cary Grant vs. Jimmy Stewart

 

Welcome back, friends, to the Lucky 13 Film Club. What are you doing to distract yourself while in lockdown? I watched a few Alfred Hitchcock films I had missed in an attempt to fill in some blindspots. After watching Suspicion (1941) starring Cary Grant and Joan Fontaine and Rope (1948), I thought to feature these two leading men and consider their collaborations with Hitchcock.

Eight movies from the 1940s and 1950s. Who was better? Cary or Jimmy? What of their leading ladies? Sometimes, they outshined their man. Do the glitz and glamour endear us to the production? What of the storyline? Can you rate them? Okay, I’ll stop. But these questions swirled in my mind as I considered the eight films. Two facts are certain. Their careers benefited from working with Alfred Hitchcock. And Hitch benefited for starring them. 

Cary and Joan Fontaine in Suspicion.

CARY GRANT  

1941 Suspicion. A shy young heiress marries a charming gentleman and soon begins to suspect he is planning to murder her. Co-starring Joan Fontaine and Cedric Hardwicke. 

1945 Notorious. American spy film noir about the entanglement of three lives during an espionage operation. Co-starring Ingrid Bergman and Claude Rains. 

1955. To Catch a Thief. Retired cat burglar Cary Grant and ravishing American party girl Grace Kelly fall in love against a backdrop of fireworks, the French Riviera and a string of unsolved jewel robberies. 

1958. North by Northwest. Ad executive Roger Thornhill is pursued by a ruthless spy after Thornhill is mistaken for a government agent. He is hunted relentlessly across the United States. Co-starring Eva Marie Saint and James Mason. 

JAMES STEWART

1948 Rope. Just before hosting a dinner party, two college students strangle a mutual friend to death after their college philosophy professor inadvertently inspires them. The body hides in a chest and becomes the elephant in the room as guests eat and chatter. Co-starring Farley Granger, John Dall, and Joan Chandler.

1954 Rear Window. Confined to a wheelchair after an accident, a recuperating news photographer believes he has witnessed a murder after spying with a telephoto lens the occupants of a neighboring apartment complex. Co-starring Grace Kelly, Thelma Ritter, and Raymond Burr. 

1956. The Man Who Knew Too Much. A doctor and his wife are on vacation in Morocco when a chance encounter with a stranger alters their lives. The stranger reveals an assassination plot and their son is abducted. Co-starring Doris Day.  

1958 Vertigo. An ex-police officer who suffers from an intense fear of heights is hired to prevent an old friend’s wife from committing suicide, but all is not as it seems as he becomes obsessed with her. Co-starring Kim Novak and Barbara Bel Geddes. 

EDITH HEAD – collaborated with Hitchcock eleven times. I don’t think you should discount her involvement — her costumes conveyed the character’s personality and often aided in Hitchcock’s setting of mood.  Of the eight films discussed today, she was the costume designer for FIVE of them. 

Cary Grant was the dashing, cool, smooth operator. His films with Hitchcock were about movement. Chases on foot, cars driving at a cliff’s edge, somewhere to go whether a plane, train, or automobile. Jimmy Stewart’s movies with Hitchcock seemed restricted by comparison. He spends most of the plot confined by space. Of course, he does move in Vertigo and The Man Who Knew too Much, but I’d say a key feature of a Jimmy Stewart performance is he is in a constant state of waiting. Cary Grant rarely sits still in his films.  I predict if you lean toward Cary’s films, you like action and adventure. If you like Jimmy, you like the psychological angst of a man who’s in a state of high anxiety.  Alfred Hitchcock specialized in both kinds of suspense.  

Do you like your actors to be warm or cool? 

GRACE KELLY  was just too beautiful to be convincing with Jimmy Stewart in Rear Window. She was better suited to stand next to Cary Grant. Their coolness and beauty mirrored each other perfectly. Doris Day was perfect as Jimmy Stewart’s wife in The Man Who Knew Too Much. She was pretty and talented and warm–better suited to the “everyday man”.  

Which was the best film for Cary and Jimmy?

When Hitchcock‘s leading pair was a combination of warm and cool, he had a masterpiece. 

James Stewart (warm) and Kim Novak (cool) in Vertigo. 

Cary Grant (warm) and Eva Marie Saint (cool) in North by Northwest

For the record, my favorite Hitchcock film is Notorious for the storyline and pairing. Mostly for my love for Ingrid Bergman and the scene-stealing acting by Claude Rains. 

Please, tell me what you think, and feel free to kindly comment on what others have to say. Thank you! 

A stunning dress by Edith Head.

Alfred Hitchcock: “Cary Grant is the only actor I ever loved in my whole life.” 

113 Comments on “L13FC: Cary Grant vs. Jimmy Stewart

  1. I am immediately going to say I prefer James Stewart. Not because I dislike Cary Grant, but because I could always see him ‘acting’, in any film he starred in. He just about stopped short of breaking the fourth wall, but it seemed he wanted the audience to be in on the act with him. One good example is ‘His Girl Friday’, where he is acting almost like a silent films comedian.

    By contrast, Stewart could be thoughtful and restrained, with films like ‘Shenandoah’ and ‘Anatomy Of A Muder’ coming to mind. So I choose ‘Rear Window’ over ‘North By Northwest’, despite Grace being too glamorous to really be his girlfriend.

    Best wishes, Pete. x

    Liked by 2 people

    • Hi Pete. James Stewart was a better actor than Grant, but Grany has comedic timing and is smart and easy on the eyes. Sticking to their four films each for Hitchcock, during the same time period, what do you think about the motion idea?

      Liked by 2 people

        • With Hitchcock, there’s a lot going on that binds or repels the audience simultaneously. That double edged sword we are glad to plunge deep into our consciousness.
          I like the supporting characters more than the starring ones. His complicated feelings for women are the stuff that make psychiatrists rich.

          Liked by 2 people

      • I think both were iconic in different ways. In retrospect, it is hard to imagine anyone else playing the troubled detective in Vertigo other than James Stewart. As for Cary Grant, his knack for comedic timing undoubtedly is hard to surpass. I mean just watch The Awful Truth or Bringing Up Baby. As for Notorious, well I love Notorious 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

          • To Cindy Bruchman: I also think that by casting Stewart, who was much older than Kim Novak, was a stroke of genius in that it made the situation pervier (subtly or otherwise) to make us viewers get into this character’s mind, not to mention his skin.

            Liked by 1 person

          • I like the premise, but it was acceptable back then for men 20 years older than the female to have for a mate. Stewart and Hitchcock were capitalizing on his popularity and who cares about jowls, bags, and wrinkles?
            BTW their age difference was 25 years!
            Since the audience had loved JS for decades, it would be natural that our love transferred over to JS’s character. It makes perfect sense that Kim NOvak’s character would love him. But did she? 🙂
            YES, by today’s morays, it would be on the weird side that the older gent got the girl. It all depends on your generation. But YES, 25 years is pushing it–that is, it adds to the character’s instability or desperation.
            I am older, so I didn’t think it was weird at all.

            Liked by 1 person

    • I personally think that both James Stewart and Cary Grant are every bit equal, albeit different, in quality. As for Westerns, I do not think Cary Grant would have pulled off what Stewart was able to pull off in those Anthony Mann directed Westerns that began with 1950’s Winchester ’73 and ended with 1955’s The Man from Laramie. While Stewart is every bit as great as Grant was at comedy, I do rank Grant a bit higher due to his suave demeanor.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. If we’re talkin’ Westerns Cindy, it’s Jimmy all the way. But they were both brilliant and charismatic Stars.
    Jimmy Westerns:
    The Shootist (1976), The Cheyenne Social Club (1970), Bandolero! (1968), Firecreek (1968), The Rare Breed (1966), Shenandoah (1965), Cheyenne Autumn (1964), How the West Was Won (1962), Two Rode Together (1961), Night Passage (1957), The Man from Laramie (1955), The Far Country (1954), The Naked Spur (1953), Bend of the River (1952), Broken Arrow (1950),
    Winchester ’73 (1950). Destry Rides Again (1939), Rose-Marie (1936).
    More Classics than klunkers in there.
    Definitely among the Top Western Film Stars of all time.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Yes, they had long careers. I was trying to limit the post to 8 films. I was curious about how Grant’s style is coolness and movement while Stewart gave emotional portrayals. Knowing this, I think it plays a factor in the type of Hitchcock film you like.

      Liked by 1 person

    • One day I will do a post on Jimmy Stewart westerns, and you will have loads to say. 😉
      So, do you like the 4 films that Hitchcock cast him in? Which is your favorite?

      Liked by 1 person

    • Whether it was with John Ford or Anthony Mann, James Stewart surpasses Cary Grant when it comes to Westerns. Then again, I do not think. that Grant was ever in a Western. Nevertheless, Grant not only equals, but surpasses Stewart at comedy.

      Liked by 1 person

        • “Lots of love for Cary!”

          To Cindy Bruchman: I wish I knew where I could find the source, but it has been said by Cary Grant himself that every man wanted to be like him – including himself 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

          • The quote is, “Everyone wants to be Cary Grant. Even I want to be Cary Grant.”

            Here are some more that makes me grin:
            –Insanity runs in my family. It practically gallops.
            –I pretended to be somebody I wanted to be until finally I became that person. Or he became me.
            –Ah, beware of snobbery; it is the unwelcome recognition of one’s own past failings.
            –I think that making love is the best form of exercise.
            –We have our factory, which is called a stage. We make a product, we color it, we title it and we ship it out in cans.
            –My father used to say, ‘Let them see you and not the suit. That should be secondary.’
            I improve on misquotation.
            –My formula for living is quite simple. I get up in the morning and I go to bed at night. In between, I occupy myself as best I can.
            –To succeed with the opposite sex, tell her you’re impotent. She can’t wait to disprove it.

            Liked by 1 person

  3. Cindy, this is terrific. I will be reflagging this tomorrow if that’s OK for you. Your analysis is spot on: Grant is suave with a 007 vibe, and Stewart is a tortured man to be sure! I shared this story I wrote for my “Hitch Hiking” series, with the best film Hitchcock never made, as “Charade” is Grant doing everything you mention in your post!

    https://johnrieber.com/2019/08/24/paris-sacre-coeur-protest-my-hitch-hiking-adventure-has-riot-police-the-best-hitchcock-film-he-never-made/

    Liked by 2 people

    • Hi John. We share the love for Hitchcock as I have enjoyed reading your posts over the years. They are both great and I think one leans toward one or the other type of suspense depending upon whether you like movement or internal conflict. Psychological suspense is interesting to me, however, with Vertigo, I was begging for the plot to move on. N by NW I could watch once a month. Vertigo sucks out all the emotion out of you. I can watch it once every five years.

      Liked by 1 person

      • That’s a very important distinction you raise, Cindy. Grant’s films are fun escapism, no matter how serious they can be….Stewart’s are psychologically DRAINING!

        Liked by 2 people

          • Here you go, but I am a fan of them all for the reasons you mention:
            Rear Window
            North By Northwest
            Vertigo
            Suspicion
            The Man Who Knew Too Much
            Notorious
            To Catch A Thief
            Rope

            Liked by 1 person

          • Thanks for that, my friend! Ah, Rear Window first!
            Okay. Mine would be:
            Notorious
            N by NW
            Rear Window
            Vertigo
            Suspicion
            To Catch a Thief
            The Man Who Knew Too Much
            Rope
            I feel bad for Rope. Generally, it’s considered the experiment that failed. I liked his 10 minute scenes and trying to keep a seamless movie without cutting.

            Liked by 1 person

          • The best part of this list is that the first 7 are bunched so tightly for me – I think I may gravitate a bit more toward the psychological suspense with Stewart versus the Grant escapades, but they are all terrific films! Agree on “Rope”!

            Liked by 1 person

        • “I think he looks remarkably like Sean C. But, no. Only Sean will do. Cary seemed to reserved for me to believe he would have been a 007.”

          To Cindy Bruchman: You are probably right on that Cindy 🙂

          Liked by 2 people

  4. This is such an awesome post Cindy!! Love both of these leading men, though I actually like Jimmy Stewart better even though Grant is the better looking of the two. I’ve only seen maybe 3-4 films of theirs each so I guess I’m not the best judge. But of course my fave is still Gregory Peck, natch 😉

    Liked by 2 people

    • Hiya Ruth! Thanks for popping round, today. Is it possible for you to rank the Jimmy S. films featured today? I betcha you’ve seen “Rear Window”. If not, I guarantee you’d love it. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • I have only seen Rear Window, so I don’t think I can rank the films, ahah. I did like that one and have been wanting to see Vertigo!

        Liked by 2 people

        • To Ruth: You are going to love Vertigo – I guarantee you that. It is one of Hitchcock’s most personal films and here he wants you to feel everything Stewart and even Novak go through. To achieve this, Hitchcock makes us feel not only what is tormenting/troubling them, but also gets us in their skin too, in a visceral way of course.

          Liked by 3 people

    • To Ruth: As I said quite a few times, James Stewart and Cary Grant are equal to and better than each other in different ways. For example, I do not think Grant could express such subtle creepiness for the tortured and troubled detective Stewart plays in Vertigo. He could not top Stewart as a cowboy either. Having said that, while Stewart can be funny, I think when it comes to comedy (wit or otherwise), nobody could do it better than Grant. Grant is great at thrillers (Notorious, North by Northwest and Charade), but as with a majority of people, we all wish we can rely on our smarts like Grant does in his films – comedy or otherwise.

      Liked by 3 people

  5. I think, Cary had the good looks to carry him through a movie. Jimmy had a life of up and down episodes for him to pull emotion from and portray on the screen. My vote is for Jimmy!!

    Liked by 2 people

      • oh, you’ve got me there! Strangers on a Train was great, but so was The Man Who Knew Too Much, North by Northwest and who can forget Psycho….
        That’s an awfully difficult question!!

        Liked by 2 people

          • That would be a sin!! I understand he was a hard man to work with, but look what he created? I think it was probably worth the effort. I wish my cable showed more of these old films!!

            Liked by 2 people

          • Isn’t it crazy how there’s so little on television now? It was our primary go to and now, I scroll down the channels and it’s all garbage. I now just rent from amazon or watching something on Netflix. Even then, it’s old. I find myself more and more renting classic films these days.

            Liked by 2 people

  6. While Grace Kelly was beautiful to look at, I found her very affected. I preferred Kim Novak to Grace Kelly who also was a treat to look at.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. I agree with everything you have to say about the films, the stars, and of course the Director. Notorious is my favorite also. You mentioned how much you liked Raines in this film.I would like to add the actress, Leopoldine Konstantine, who played his mother. She ranks with Angela Lansbury as the mother in Manchurian Candidate. Actually one of Hitchcock’s strengths is his casting in lesser roles.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Don! Yay! Not many would pick Notorious as their favorite Hitchcock picture. I’m glad you did. 🙂 Yes, yes, yes. I couldn’t agree more. Forget the leads. I like the supporting cast. They are far more interesting. Leopoldine Konstantine was magnificent. Hitchcock had issues with his mother (so I hear, so I’ve been told) being controlling. I love that dynamic that Hitchcock returns to again and again — the woman desired who is unreachable for the common man and the mother who is manipulative and controls her son as though he were her husband. Yuck. But it happens. You can just see Hitchcock peeking through holes, lusting after cold blondes, demanding control in his work as a man to offset the confines of his youth. Oh, I could go on all day.
      Notorious — favorite scene? I love the key in her hand as she slides down the stairs at the party. I also love when Desmond comes to save her and he sneaks into the house to rescue her. I’m always riveted.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Great post. Great juxtaposition. I was just communicating with another blogger about Carey Grant. I have an affinity for him. His style. His elegance. His sense of time. He’s a dancer. An athlete. And he’s an actor, most definitely. I concur that sometimes he overdoes it a bit, for my taste, but that’s because he is first and foremost an entertainer. He is willing to work for us. He’s cool but he cares. He wants us to like him. I speak of him in the present because his performances are so alive and that is the way I think of him.
    All of that said, with the exception of North by Northwest, I like the films with James Stewart better.
    As for chemistry of leading man and leading lady, it’s Grant and Eva Marie Saint. The temperature is so sultry, it’s almost uncomfortable.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Pam, your comments are great. I agree with you very much about Cary Grant. I like gentlemen, and he was it. I like how smart he is and his timing. He wasn’t open and expressive, but he just commanded the space he was in. Eva was obviously enjoying her job across from him. Sultry is right. It’s her that was so. It’s a side of her I hadn’t seen before. So much better in N by NW than On the Waterfront–and I loved her in it!

      Liked by 2 people

      • Indeed. Eva Marie Saint was excellent actor. She was fantastic in On the Waterfront. I don’t know that I’d say she was better in North by Northwest, but she was definitely the polar opposite of Edie. That’s the mark of a great actor; someone who can step into a role, any role and make you believe them. Too bad she didn’t make more films, but if memory serves me correct, she bowed out on her own terms.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Can you believe she is 95 years old? When her kids were young, she only did movie a year. Hitchcock directed her to “Lower your voice, don’t use your hands, and always look at Cary Grant’s eyes.” That was from a CBS Interview when she was 93.

          Liked by 2 people

    • I think James Stewart and Cary Grant are equal at some things and better at others. As I said before, I do not think that Grant could have pulled off what Stewart did in Vertigo. Whereas I could see Stewart as a tormented and troubled, not to mention subtly creepy, detective in Vertigo, Grant would look unconvincing. Nevertheless, when it came to thrillers, Grant was still perfect and that was because most of them were either elegant tales about intrigue (Notorious) or comedic ones like North by Northwest. While both were equal at comedy, I would rank Grant much higher, but I do not think that Grant could play a cowboy like James Stewart does in his Westerns for John Ford and Anthony Mann.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. I literally can’t answer this question. They are two of my all-time favorites and both have such captivating strengths. Narrowing their careers down to that one window makes it a little easier but not enough for me to make a choice. I’m such a huge fan of both. Sorry for the cop-out answer. 😂

    Liked by 2 people

    • Hi Keith. I’m sure you must have seen some Hitchcock. Of the eight films featured in the post starring Stewart and Grant, do you have a preference? That is, Grant is cool and stars in action suspense while Stewart is warm and confined in his setting. I remember a post of yours about Rear Window. Have you seen North by Northwest?

      Liked by 2 people

    • To Keith: I feel the same way 🙂 The only thing I will add is that they are both equal and better at the other in different ways. Nevertheless, they are both great actors 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  10. Fabulous post and comments, your L13FC series never disappoints. I haven’t seen all 8 films, of the 4 I have seen, I’d rank North by Northwest and To Catch a Thief above Rear Window and Vertigo. That’s just my taste, I tend to prefer adventure and escapism, especially at the moment. Cary and Jimmy are iconic, it’s difficult to choose between them, with so many classic films in their filmographies. I thought Stewart was great in The Flight of the Phoenix, a childhood favourite I still enjoy today. When it comes to the leading ladies, I agree with you about Grace Kelly, I much preferred her chemistry with Cary in To Catch a Thief. She always looked incredibly elegant in Edith Head’s costumes.

    Liked by 2 people

  11. Cindy you are doing a great job moderating this blog entry of yours 🙂 I am enjoying all of the comments here, which I am contributing to myself 🙂 Anyway, keep up the great work as always 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

      • “I was glad to see your return, John. You are a good sport to comment on everyone’s entries. More who feel comfortable sharing their thoughts, the better, IMO.”

        To Cindy Bruchman: Why you are so kind thank you 🙂 I am amazed Bill White has not commented on this post yet 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

          • “It takes him a few days before he comments. I think he waits for the others to say their peace and then he talks to us. 🙂
            Take that as a compliment.”

            To Cindy Bruchman: Oh I have no problem with him waiting for others to comment first 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

  12. “Thanks for that, my friend! Ah, Rear Window first!
    Okay. Mine would be:
    Notorious
    N by NW
    Rear Window
    Vertigo
    Suspicion
    To Catch a Thief
    The Man Who Knew Too Much
    Rope
    I feel bad for Rope. Generally, it’s considered the experiment that failed. I liked his 10 minute scenes and trying to keep a seamless movie without cutting.”

    To Cindy Brunchman: You may have read this already, but here is a link to my favorites below 🙂 And yes, Rope deserves more credit than it usually gets.

    https://cinematiccoffee.com/2018/04/27/my-favorite-alfred-hitchcock-films/

    Like

      • Well there is no denying that it is a minor great Hitchcock film, but that is not a bad thing – not every masterpiece can be a major work of art. Rope is said to have been inspired (loosely or otherwise) by a real-life case involving two University of Chicago students named Nathan Freudenthal Leopold Jr. and Richard Albert Loeb, who in 1924, kidnapped and murdered a 14-year-old boy named Bobby Franks. Here is a link to the article below

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leopold_and_Loeb

        I also think that it is underrated mainly due to how we overrate (or slightly overrate) gimmick films nowadays (the good, but not great Birdman from 2014 and 1917 from 2019). Given Rope’s theatrical origins (it was based on Patrick Hamilton’s 1929 play, which was also based on the aforementioned 1924 case), Hitchcock might have felt that shooting it in one continuous long take was the best way to make it feel like the viewer was watching a theatrical play on film. Not too far-fetched considering that Hitchcock only used one setting here. In 2002, Russian director Alexander Sokurov achieved the same effect, only with a steadicam camera, with Russian Ark. Steadicam cameras did not exist prior to 1976.

        I hope that helps 🙂

        Like

        • “Hitchcock might have felt that shooting it in one continuous long take was the best way to make it feel like the viewer was watching a theatrical play on film” –YES that’s what I read in a JS article. That was his goal, but it didn’t come off right.

          Thanks so much for your participation today!

          Liked by 1 person

          • “Hitchcock might have felt that shooting it in one continuous long take was the best way to make it feel like the viewer was watching a theatrical play on film” –YES that’s what I read in a JS article. That was his goal, but it didn’t come off right.

            Thanks so much for your participation today!”

            To Cindy Bruchman: I actually think it came off perfect considering that was Hitchcock’s intent, but I know reaction to Rope is mixed so I probably should not be surprised 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

  13. “I like the premise, but it was acceptable back then for men 20 years older than the female to have for a mate. Stewart and Hitchcock were capitalizing on his popularity and who cares about jowls, bags, and wrinkles?
    BTW their age difference was 25 years!
    Since the audience had loved JS for decades, it would be natural that our love transferred over to JS’s character. It makes perfect sense that Kim NOvak’s character would love him. But did she? 🙂
    YES, by today’s morays, it would be on the weird side that the older gent got the girl. It all depends on your generation. But YES, 25 years is pushing it–that is, it adds to the character’s instability or desperation.
    I am older, so I didn’t think it was weird at all.”

    To Cindy Bruchman: Oh I knew it was acceptable back then, I was just commenting on how If anyone today had a problem with that age difference, they can turn it into a positive by taking into account the Jimmy Stewart character’s unhealthy obsession with Kim Novak’s character and how he wants to make her into the image he wants. Despite being much younger than you, I too did not see anything weird about it considering that back then, a big age difference was acceptable.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. “The quote is, “Everyone wants to be Cary Grant. Even I want to be Cary Grant.”

    Here are some more that makes me grin:
    –Insanity runs in my family. It practically gallops.
    –I pretended to be somebody I wanted to be until finally I became that person. Or he became me.
    –Ah, beware of snobbery; it is the unwelcome recognition of one’s own past failings.
    –I think that making love is the best form of exercise.
    –We have our factory, which is called a stage. We make a product, we color it, we title it and we ship it out in cans.
    –My father used to say, ‘Let them see you and not the suit. That should be secondary.’
    I improve on misquotation.
    –My formula for living is quite simple. I get up in the morning and I go to bed at night. In between, I occupy myself as best I can.
    –To succeed with the opposite sex, tell her you’re impotent. She can’t wait to disprove it.

    To Cindy Bruchman: Thank you for finding the quote and extra thanks for some of those other Cary Grant quotes 🙂 They make me laugh as well 🙂

    Like

  15. I really enjoyed the movies they played in. You gave me some encouragement over my writer’s block a couple of weeks ago so I finished a ten chapter one this morning based in Singapore and Australia. It will be a few weeks before I put the first one up Cindy as my present series based in India has to run through first. 🙂 Thanks for inspiring me!

    Liked by 3 people

  16. No contest. Cary Grant. Mush mouth Jimmy Stewart was perfect for Frank Capra, but I disliked his work for Hitchcock, whose films were defined more by their women than men. Tippi Hedren is my favorite Hitchcock protagonist even though she cant act She and Rod Taylor. who is almost as bad as Miss Hedren. were the perfect Hitchcock couple, while Grace Kelly and Cary Grant were his ideal glamour couple. My favorite Hitchcock performance, however, is Cary Grant in North by Northwest, and my least favorite is Stewart in Vertigo. I loved what the 60 year oldCary Grant told director Ralph Nelson when he was cast across from 33 year old Leslie Caron in Father Goose. “I wont kiss her first. That would be creepy. She has to kiss me first or I wont do it.”

    Liked by 3 people

    • “No contest. Cary Grant. Mush mouth Jimmy Stewart was perfect for Frank Capra, but I disliked his work for Hitchcock, whose films were defined more by their women than men. Tippi Hedren is my favorite Hitchcock protagonist even though she cant act She and Rod Taylor. who is almost as bad as Miss Hedren. were the perfect Hitchcock couple, while Grace Kelly and Cary Grant were his ideal glamour couple. My favorite Hitchcock performance, however, is Cary Grant in North by Northwest, and my least favorite is Stewart in Vertigo. I loved what the 60 year oldCary Grant told director Ralph Nelson when he was cast across from 33 year old Leslie Caron in Father Goose. “I wont kiss her first. That would be creepy. She has to kiss me first or I wont do it.”

      To Bill White: I personally feel that both of them are equal and better than each other at the same time. Also Jimmy Stewart was perfect in Vertigo. Intentionally or unintentionally, casting a much younger Kim Novak as his object of desire helped make the situation pervier considering that Stewart was much older than she. Stewart’s character becomes so tormented and troubled after that opening scene that he does not even aware that he is becoming creepy in the process with his unhealthy obsession with Kim Novak’s character – remaking her in the image he wants.

      As great as Stewart is at comedy, it is undeniable that Cary Grant surpasses him at comedy. Also, it is undeniable that nobody could play Grant Thornhill other than Cary Grant in North by Northwest.

      Having said all of this, you will be happy to know that The Birds is my number one favorite Alfred Hitchcock film. In case you are interested, here is a link below to my favorite Alfred Hitchcock films

      https://cinematiccoffee.com/2018/04/27/my-favorite-alfred-hitchcock-films/

      Like

  17. Almost 100 comments on this post is proof of the enduring appeal of Cary Grant and James Stewart. It gladdens my heart to know people still love old movies?

    Liked by 1 person

  18. You pinpointed why Stewart and Grant each had a distinct and different talent. Hitchcock knew that, and he was the master at using each one and their talents in his movies. I love them both. Every Hitchcock film is brilliant, therefore both actors shine.

    Can you help me remember the title of the Jimmy Stewart movie where he and his brother divide sides in WWII? The end of the movie is a thrilling scene with Jimmy Stewart and his fiancé or bride skiing down the slopes to escape the Nazis. I don’t know if it was a Hitchcock movie, but it was one of the best.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. In my opinion, Cary and Jimmy did their best.work for Hitch. I believe Jimmy’s best performance is the retired detective in Vertigo, and I think Cary’s all-time best is his morally conflicted spy in Notorious. Interestingly, Cary was Hitch’s first choice for Rope (I believe Hitch also wanted Cary for Dial M for Murder), and Jimmy campaigned for the lead role in North by Northwest. Anyhow, I like both actors for different reasons.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Eric. I agree with you. Both men went back and forth with Hitch for roles during a fifteen year period. Both men bring a unique dimension to the Hitchcock filmography.

      Liked by 1 person

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  21. Pingback: L13FC: Cary Grant vs. Jimmy Stewart — Cindy Bruchman | Crime/Mystery Film & Writing Festival

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