Five Shots: Rome

Colosseum at Night

The first time I went to Rome was a decade ago and it was 105 (40c) degrees Fahrenheit. It was hard to appreciate much of anything while squinting through the haze and rubbing shoulders with a thousand tourists. Still, the Sistine Chapel made me cry, and the Colleseum lived up to the hype. It’s a beautiful structure and worth any aggravation to see it. Why? It’s one of those rare antiquities where you can actually touch it, wrap your arms around it, feel the history seep in, and no one will shoot you for doing so.

view of rome
On one of the seven hills surrounding Rome.

This time, I was shocked with pleasure at how cool was Rome. There were a couple afternoon drizzles (very unique for we Arizonians) and a breeze followed us around in 67 – 75-degree temperatures. Our group split up and we walked at our leisure from one side of Rome to the other, rambling through side streets and neighborhoods with energy and fascination. We frequently stopped to have a drink and people watch. We consumed pizza and pasta, and for the fashion conscious pair in my life, I bought Italian shoes for my son and designer sunglasses for my daughter-in-law. I was surprised how much fun I had in Rome.

Here are a few shots of our four days there. Which one do you like best?

Experiencing the quiet at the Roman Botanical Gardens
Ponte Garibaldi view of the Tiber River
bridges
Ponte Sisto super Fiume Tevere

Looking Up
Inside the Colleseum
Halls in the Vatican to the Sistine Chapel
School of Athens fresco (A dream come true!)
A maiden in the School of Athens
Raphael wearing the black hat
Roman Fountain
Jim and Cindy
pizza
Pizza (again) for Lunch
Trevi Fountain
Trevi Fountain
At the Forum–that’s what I call a door.

The Best Shots of 2017

Here is a roundup of favorite pictures I took during this year. Which one do you like best?

1. A rare snow fell on the Verde Valley, Arizona
2. The Sycamore Canyon Wilderness, AZ
3. Madrid delectables
4. Plaza de España bridges in Seville
5. The marriage of curves and lines
6. La Casa de Pilatos
7. The Alcázar of Seville basement
8. Gaudí elevator
9. Toledo
10. Hotel stairs, Barcelona
11. Bodie Lighthouse, North Carolina

12. Late Summer, Hart Prairie, Flagstaff

13. Kayaking at Woods Canyon Lake, Mogollon Rim, AZ

Five Shots: The Colors and Patterns of Spain, Part II

Thanks to all who visited recent photo posts highlighting the educational traveling tour to Madrid, Toledo, Seville, and Barcelona. Here’s the last set. Which one do you like best?  

Toledo door
Toledo Castle, a Benedictine Monastery, then home to the Knights Templar
Toledo street corner by the Ibn Shushan Synagogue
Oldest standing Synagogue in Europe, Toledo, erected in 1180.
Catedral Primada Santa María de Toledo

typical shop window in Madrid
General Archives of the Indies, Seville. A repository of extremely valuable archival documents illustrating the history of the Spanish Empire in the Americas and the Philippines.
987 AD, The Mosque–Cathedral of Córdoba
The Plaza de España is a plaza in the Parque de María Luisa, in Seville, Spain, built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929
The Plaza de España
A staircase at the Plaza de España

 

ceiling at The Plaza de España

A bridge at The Plaza de España
Pilate’s awesome house

Spanish version of Tiramisu
The Alcázar of Seville
The Alcázar of Seville has many beautiful gardens
The Alcázar of Seville basement
La Casa de Pilatos

Barcelona at night

Spain’s architecture is dizzying, but by some miracle, the shapes and patterns blend together in harmony. The ornate details are draw-dropping. Thank you for accompanying me. Next June’s trip is Southern Italy….

 

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