Five Shots: Plateau Sunset

1. Campfire at the edge

The plateau at the edge of the Sycamore Canyon, Arizona is a ridge line with a 360 view. The Northeastern view is comprised of the outlying Red Rocks bordering Sedona. Looking Southwest, the sun sets over Mingus Mountain. It has become over recent years a favorite spot for us to relax and star gaze without light pollution or crowds. Last night our family went out on the plateau to catch the meteor shower. We weren’t disappointed. Before the light show, the clouds entertained us. Here are some shots from last night.

2. Sea Horses
3. Rainbow Fingers
4. Big Sky
5. Vista to the Red Rocks
6. Yellow Glow

Which one do you like best?

Five Shots: Clouds on the Rim

Some of our visiting family have never been to Eastern Arizona. Most people assume Arizona looks like the Phoenix landscape.  90 miles north, the Mogollon Rim is one of my favorite spots in this diverse state. Arizona ranks 6th in size among the 50 states. The total area of Arizona is 114,000 sq mi (295,260 sq km), of which land takes up 113,508 sq mi (293,986 sq km) and inland water 492 sq mi (1,274 sq km).  Here are some shots I took kayaking and hiking around the rim. The clouds were colossal. Which photo do you like best?

Bright Blue Sky
Kayaking on Woods Canyon Lake
Soft Reflection
Shore Line
Creeping Clouds
Far Side of the Lake
At the Edge
The Mogollon Rim

Five Shots: Perkinsville Road

I can’t rave enough the day trip experience riding out on Perkinsville Road which begins at Jerome, AZ and eventually connects to the overland trail/road at Kaibab Forest and comes out at a splendorous spot, Garland Prairie, west of Flagstaff. Dislike crowds and congestion? When you come to visit Arizona, try this road trip for an authentic cowboy experience that would make Zane Grey proud. Which is your favorite picture?

1. The crowd is in Jerome. Two minutes past the mining town, the road cuts away into the wilderness.
2. A faraway fire makes for a cloudy day. Looking back at Jerome and the Verde Valley.
3. Facing Chino Valley and heading to the back side of Sycamore Canyon Wilderness.
4. Tall Sentry plant. Surely Dr. Seuss was inspired by these giants?
5. Plate-sized sentry blossoms
6. White Desert Poppy
7. Juniper foreground to Sycamore Canyon cliffs
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8. I can see for miles.
9. Desert Black and White Cow
10. Tiger Striped Milker
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11. Entering Kaibab National Forest
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12. JD Dam
13. Out of the pines into Garland Prairie. The San Francisco Peaks are in the distance.
14. Old cabin in the prairie.
15. Clouds over the San Francisco Peaks
16. Dirt Road to Interstate 40 (Route 66) which runs across the country for over 2,000 miles.
17. A fine Saturday drive. Back downtown to the Verde Valley, an hour south of Flagstaff.

 

 

Five Shots: Cacti Are Blooming

With lots of rainfall over the winter, Arizona is experiencing a grand blossoming. I love it when the cacti bloom. The contrast between the prickly texture of the paddles against the soft, yet obscene blossoms make this time of year a treat. Here are some of my favorite shots. Which one do you like best?

1.White Queen Blossom
2. Quite the handful
3. Green Nubs
4. Fuschia and Yellow
5. Yellow Paddle in the Sun
6. Sherbert Tips
7. Pink Tips on Green Paddle
8. Three Ladies
9. Cluster In Front of Gray Skies

Five Shots: More Butterlies

Farming Butterflies

Who knew farming butterflies and observing their cycle intimately in a Butterfly House could be a therapeutic experience? Quite a few of you enjoyed yesterday’s butterfly post. I pulled a few more shots to share. Which one do you prefer the most?

1. Yellow Eyes
2. Green Glory
3. Ebony and Ivory
4. Mammoth Moth on Palm Leaves
5. Black Beauty
6. Here’s looking at you!
7. A Pair of Beauties

Five Shots: Butterfly Wonderland

Growing Butterflies

I was in Phoenix today with family enjoying the 3,000 butterflies fluttering around us at Butterfly Wonderland. What did I learn? It takes three generations in the span of a year for the Monarch Butterfly to complete the great migration. It begins in the hills of Texas where butterflies feed on Milkweed. Then they produce the next generation which flies up to Toronto. The final generation senses winter is coming, so they fly south to Mexico, riding the wind, sometimes up to a mile high. They spend the winter in Mexico, billions of them. Then they return to Texas.  I apologize for not knowing the names of the species we encountered today. Here a dozen shots for you today. Which shot do you like best?

1. Attracted to Orchids
2. Sharp Shooter
3. The Hitchhiker

 

4. Gentle Queen
5. Sunbathing with Orange Hibiscus
6. In with the Green
7. Orange Slices
8. Fanning on Palm Leaves
9. A & W
10. Ghost
11. Blue Giant
12. Butterfly Pole

 

 

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