Five Shots: The Colors and Patterns of Spain, Part II

Thanks to all who visited recent photo posts highlighting the educational traveling tour to Madrid, Toledo, Seville, and Barcelona. Here’s the last set. Which one do you like best?  

Toledo door
Toledo Castle, a Benedictine Monastery, then home to the Knights Templar
Toledo street corner by the Ibn Shushan Synagogue
Oldest standing Synagogue in Europe, Toledo, erected in 1180.
Catedral Primada Santa María de Toledo

typical shop window in Madrid
General Archives of the Indies, Seville. A repository of extremely valuable archival documents illustrating the history of the Spanish Empire in the Americas and the Philippines.
987 AD, The Mosque–Cathedral of Córdoba
The Plaza de España is a plaza in the Parque de María Luisa, in Seville, Spain, built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929
The Plaza de España
A staircase at the Plaza de España

 

ceiling at The Plaza de España

A bridge at The Plaza de España
Pilate’s awesome house

Spanish version of Tiramisu
The Alcázar of Seville
The Alcázar of Seville has many beautiful gardens
The Alcázar of Seville basement
La Casa de Pilatos

Barcelona at night

Spain’s architecture is dizzying, but by some miracle, the shapes and patterns blend together in harmony. The ornate details are draw-dropping. Thank you for accompanying me. Next June’s trip is Southern Italy….

 

Five Shots: Food in Madrid

Famous market in Madrid for fresh foods, wines, and exotic fish.
1. Cherries
2. Green Olives
3. I don’t know. You tell me.
4. Mozzarella balls
5. Spaniards love their ham.
6. Jamón ibérico. In Italy it is called prosciutto.
7. A typical lunch
9. Red Prawns and Sardines
10. Swordfish
12. Olive delight
13. cheese and peppers

The colors and sights and sounds of the crowded market was a highlight of visiting Madrid.

Five Shots: The Colors and Patterns of Spain Part I

1. Basement of the Alcázar of Seville, a royal palace in Seville, Andalusia, Spain, originally developed by Moorish Muslim kings

Traveling to Madrid, Toledo, Seville, and Barcelona was filled with heat (35-44c), bright colors, fun food, and boundless patterns everywhere. Here are some pictures highlighting the colors and patterns from the trip. You decide which is the best shot.

2. The Plaza Mayor was built during Philip III’s reign (1598–1621) and is a central plaza in the city of Madrid, Spain.
3. Joan Enjoying Anchovies at Plaza Mayor

 

4. Flamenco performance in Seville
5. The Casa de Pilatos, Pontius Pilate’s house, Seville
6. Pontius Pilate’s House, downstairs courtyard
7. Inside looking out at Pilate’s House

 

8. The Great Mosque of Cordoba, two hours south of Madrid, was a Visigoth, Christian temple converted into a Mosque when Muslims ruled in the late 8th century.
8. Toledo Castle
9. Corpus Christi celebration, Toledo
10. Santa María la Blanca is a museum and former synagogue in Toledo, Spain. 1180.

 

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11. Cold tomato soup, Sangria, and a fan to keep the face cool.

 

Five Shots: Where Am I ?

I’ve just returned from traveling with students and new friends. Here are clues for my traveling blogosphere buddies. Can you place me in the right country? Give yourself a point.  Another for guessing the city. Award yourself a final point if you can guess the famous location/building.

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Which shot would you jump into? How many points did you get?

Thomas Hardy and Pints at The Wiseman

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In 1996, I studied Thomas Hardy (Tess of the d’Urbervilles) in Dorset County, England for six weeks during the summer.  Dr. Morgan, an Illinois State University professor, was a Hardy Scholar and for over 20 years, he took students to this south-central slice of heaven. Before his retirement, I signed up for the graduate English course as one of a group of twelve. An Elizabethan summer home was converted into an Agricultural College and while students were out for the summer, our group used their dorm rooms and facilities.

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The upside to the incessant rain in June provided lush gardens for us to enjoy in July. img-216113732img-216113732

During the day, the gazebo at the top of this croquet garden was the perfect spot for reading Thomas Hardy’s books and poetry. At night, it was the perfect confessional for heart-to-heart talks under the stars.  Thomas Hardy lived in and loved Dorset County so much, he set his novels about the county, but changed the names of the towns and hamlets to fictional ones. For his most famous novel, Tess of the d’Urbervilles, our time in the Elizabethan mansion was a location spot, too. Hardy’s satirical story of Tess was a sad one. She was a milkmaid who was raped, loved and lost her man Angel. She became a mistress and a murderess. The double-standard of the Victorian female purity makes Tess a significant British novel.

For each of Hardy’s novels, we journeyed to the exact location of the plot and read it there. One such spot was Stonehenge. When I first visited Stonehenge in the late 70s, you could walk in and around and hug the stones, if you wanted. By the time I was last there in 1996, they had roped off the area due to vandalism. Imagine spray-painting one of the druid stones. Blasphemy! Now all one can do is walk around them from afar. If getting close to rocks is your thing, head up north to the other end of the island and take a ferry to the Orkney and Shetland Islands and you can dance around ancient rocks all day long.

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One spot (above) in Tess of the d’Urbervilles is the Sandbourne seaside resort area. Very close by is Lulworth Cove where a person can hike the trails for hundreds of miles along the southern coast. When I return to the area someday, I imagine hiking all day, followed by pints in the evening and a night in a B & B. What a great way to spend a summer in England, I daydream. Here are some of my favorite shots that I took.

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Speaking of pints, I love English pubs, especially thatched ones. When class was over for the day and we exhausted every angle of analyzing Tess, a small group of us would head off a mile away for evening mingling with the locals at The Wise Man Inn.

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Tuesdays were dart night. The league was getting ready to begin when a few of the men from the village had not shown up. There was a grandfatherly type who ran the show and he asked our table of six girls if anyone wanted to fill in. It just so happened I was a pretty good dart player; I had lots of practice when I lived in Scotland while stationed in the Navy.

dartboard

Feeling merry from the lager, I stood at the line, facing the board and wondered where to throw. UK dart players can count backward from 301 and reach zero a lot faster than I can, and the experienced dart players in a league liked to play quickly. It was our turn, and we had 103 points remaining to win the game. My partner, the old gentleman who’d been playing for sixty years, stood next to my ear and whispered where I was to throw the darts. “Triple 20.” Pling!  He whispered again, “Triple 13.” It was like he was in my mind talking to my hand. Perfect. Finally, he said, “Double two.”  Ha! We won the game, and everyone clapped. It was one of my finer moments.

“The Voice”

By Thomas Hardy

 

Woman much missed, how you call to me, call to me,
Saying that now you are not as you were
When you had changed from the one who was all to me,
But as at first, when our day was fair.
Can it be you that I hear? Let me view you, then,
Standing as when I drew near to the town
Where you would wait for me: yes, as I knew you then,
Even to the original air-blue gown!
Or is it only the breeze, in its listlessness
Travelling across the wet mead to me here,
You being ever dissolved to wan wistlessness,
Heard no more again far or near?
Thus I; faltering forward,
Leaves around me falling,
Wind oozing thin through the thorn from norward,
And the woman calling.

Five Shots: A Revisit to Greece

Six months ago, our educational traveling group went to Athens and island hopped in the Aegean Sea. I’m sure I took over a hundred photos, but only shared a few. If you missed the original posts, I linked them at the end. I enjoy looking at summer shots during the winter and vice versa. They always stir a memory. Here are 5 + 10 shots you haven’t seen.

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1. Patmos dinner at the beach
2. Mykonos Harbor
2. Mykonos Harbor
3. Mykonos Windmills
3. Mykonos Windmills
4. Mykonos Sunset
4. Mykonos Sunset
5. Mykonos Sunset II
5. Mykonos Sunset II
6. Mykonos High Tide
6. Mykonos High Tide
7. Mykonos at night
7. Mykonos at night
8. Rhodes Fortress in the Harbor
8. Rhodes Fortress in the Harbor
9. Rhodes North Beach
9. Rhodes North Beach
10. Rhodes North Beach II
10. Rhodes North Beach II
12. Rhodes North Beach III
11. Rhodes North Beach III
13. Santorini
12. Santorini
14. Santorini II
13. Santorini II
15. Santorini III
14. Santorini III
16. Good bye, Athens.
15. Goodbye, Athens.
Which ones resonate with you? 

If you missed the original posts, check them out here:

https://cindybruchman.com/2016/07/17/five-shots-the-coast-of-rhodes/

https://cindybruchman.com/2016/07/04/educational-traveling-greece/

https://cindybruchman.com/2016/07/22/five-shots-walking-around-santorini/

https://cindybruchman.com/2016/07/18/hell-and-the-hookah-bar/

https://cindybruchman.com/2016/07/10/five-shots-the-acropolis-at-athens/

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