Five Shots: Food in London & Scotland

I love to eat and drink. On vacation, it’s important to me to try authentic dishes. Sampling Scotch whiskey in Scotland was a treat as well as trying the haggis, neeps and tatties (organs from the goat ground with hops with mashed turnips and mashed potatoes and whiskey sauce) the various meat pies and fish and chips, of course. Then there was the freshwater salmon, the haddock and cod, oysters, mussels, scallops–again, coming from the desert, this was a sublime menu. In London, we ate marvelous Indian, Korean, Chinese food, too.

Smoked Salmon and goat cheese
The menu of a Chinese restaurant in SoHo.
Lunch. I have no idea what I’m eating.
I still have no idea what I’m eating and I was hungry afterward.

 

Fish and Chips
A “Frenchy” cafe in Kensington, London
Oysters and Glenfiddich15.
Harrods of London, sweets, and macaroons

Five Shots: Glencoe and Loch Ness

Here are a set of shots I took traveling through Glencoe Glen into the Scottish Highlands on our way to Loch Ness. Our group loved getting caught in the rain. Living in the desert, this was as foreign terrain as we could have asked for and the Highlands held us spellbound. Which one do you like best?

Caught in the Rain
Glencoe Glen
Ulani, my granddaughter
Pansies shot by Annette.
Highland cattle are a Scottish cattle breed.
Castle Urquhart on Loch Ness
Loch Ness
Steps at Urquhart

I appreciated how pristine the region was. No pollution or human traces of developments or resorts or water traffic on the lochs. The houses are stone and plaster and there’s no such thing as a billboard. It truly felt like I had stepped back in time.

1 Shot Wednesday: Urquhart Castle

My annual summer trip abroad with students and family was outstanding. We went to London and Scotland. We got back yesterday, so as I organize my photos, I will offer one today. Our group went to the Highland Mountains and visited Loch Ness. From Wikipedia: “Urquhart Castle is a fortress that sits beside Loch Ness in the Highlands of Scotland. The castle is on the A82 road, 21 kilometres south-west of Inverness and 2 kilometres east of the village of Drumnadrochit. The present ruins date from the 13th to the 16th centuries, though built on the site of an early medieval fortification.”

Dark waters caused by peat deposits obscure Nessie the monster and the actual depth of the loch. We enjoyed our visit exploring the ruins including a boat ride. I haven’t been to Scotland since 1984 when I was in the Navy and stationed above the Highland Mountains at Thurso, the northern tip. It was a homecoming. More photos forthcoming.

Urquhart Castle

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